“The main road”

A reflection on Jesus’ suffering and our own, appropriate for this Good Friday, from C. S. Lewis’ Letters to Malcom (p. 63-65):

We all try to accept with some sort of submission our afflictions when they actually arrive. But the prayer in Gethsemane shows that the preceding anxiety is equally God’s will and equally part of our human destiny. The perfect Man experienced it. And the servant is not greater than the master. We are Christians, not Stoics.

Does not every movement in the Passion write large some common element in the sufferings of our race? First, the prayer of anguish; not granted. Then He turns to His friends. They are asleep—as ours, or we, are so often, or busy, or away, or preoccupied. Then He faces the Church; the very Church that He brought into existence. It condemns Him. … But there seems to be another chance. There is the State; in this case, the Roman state. … It claims to be just, on a rough, worldly level. Yes, but only so far as is consistent with political expediency and raison d’état. One becomes a counter in a complicated game. But even now all is not lost. There is still an appeal to the People—the poor and simple whom He had blessed, whom He had healed and fed and taught, to whom He himself belongs. But they have become over-night (it is nothing unusual) a murderous rabble shouting for His blood. There is, then, nothing left but God. And to God, God’s last words are, “Why hast thou forsaken me?”

You see how characteristic, how representative, it all is. The human situation writ large. These are among the things it means to be a man. Every rope breaks when you seize it. Every door is slammed shut as you reach it. To be like the fox at the end of the run; the earths all staked. …

Far from lightening the dark valley where you now find yourself, I blacken it. And you know why. Your darkness has brought back my own. … I think it is only in a shared darkness that you and I can really meet at present; shared with one another and, what matters most, with our Master. We are not on an untrodden path. Rather, on the main-road.

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1 comment
  1. Hum fire! Way to dig up this tough-as-a-diamond gem! Thanks for sharing. On this Good Friday when all my focus is prepping for Sunday’s message on the resurrection, God keeps sending others my way with reminders that the whole week is all about his death-and-resurrection. – On the Watchtower in Ariège, SW France

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